Advocacy

Start Free, Stay Free, AIDS Free: On the Super-Fast Track to ending AIDS in Children, Adolescents and Young Woman in 2020

Start Free, Stay Free, AIDS Free: On the Super-Fast Track to ending AIDS in Children, Adolescents and Young Woman in 2020

RIATT-ESA is working on behalf of children and adolescents and their families, to encourage national governments as well as national, regional and international stakeholders to pursue the objectives of the Start Free, Stay Free, AIDS Free framework. 

Time to Step-up: Prioritize Children, Adolescents, Families and Carers Affected By AIDS in Eastern and Southern Africa: Executive Summary

The Call to Action Outlines Action Steps Needed to Prioritize Children Affected by AIDS in the era of the Sustainable Development Goals

Ending the HIV pandemic is possible, but to do so, we must act quickly and recognize that the needs of children—the most vulnerable among us and unable to advocate on their own behalf—include but go beyond ending the spread of HIV and finding a cure.

Understanding Fast-Track Accelerating Action To End the AIDS Epidemic By 2013

WE CAN END THE AIDS EPIDEMIC BY 2030 


Impressive advances in science, accumulated implementation experience, political commitments, community activism, human rights advances, global solidarity and attendant resources have offered us an historic opportunity to end the AIDS epidemic as a public health threat by 2030.

The Fast-Track approach is an agenda for quickening the pace of implementation, focus and change at the global, regional, country, province, district and city levels. It involves setting ambitious targets and accelerating the delivery of high-impact HIV prevention and treatment services. It means using innovation to expand services, to better address people’s needs and perspectives and focus on the locations and populations with the highest HIV burden. It addresses social and legal barriers and advances human rights and gender equality. 

The Full Report of the Regional Consultation on the UNAIDS Strategy 2016-2021: East and Southern Africa

This Executive Summary with Key Messages captures the rich discussions and recommendation of the priorities for the region.

The consultation was welcomed by participants and the opportunity to make input to the UNAIDS Strategy 2016-2021 was appreciated. The discussions were robust, thoughtful and direct. The region has a clear view of its priorities, and the directions it needs to go. There was a depth of experience from different perspectives of the HIV epidemic, that currently characterizes the region: it knows its epidemic, knows what drives it, has lived and worked with it for decades and knows what works, doesn’t expect any ‘quick fixes’, but is also quick to recognize changes in situation, circumstance and epidemiological reality, and respond to them. There is a strong sense that the region will emerge better at the end of AIDS.

See the Final Report Here

Final Report of the Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Consultation on the UNAIDS Strategy 2016 – 2021

Report of the Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Consultation on the UNAIDS Strategy 2016 – 2021

The consultation comprised a number of elements, clustered round a one-day Consultation held in Johannesburg on 23rd March 2015. These were:

  • Wide dissemination of the UNAIDS Discussion Paper “Getting to Zero: How will we Fast-Track the Response?” in the region; this formed the basic platform for all elements of the regional consultation;
  • Three constituency-specific consultations: an e-survey of civil society, a Human Rights and Social Justice Eastern and Southern Africa regional consultation, and Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Treatment Forum.
  • The International Disability and Development Consortium (IDDC) submitted a draft discussion paper with regard to the pressing need for the better inclusion of people with disabilities.
  • The One-day Consultation: this used plenary and group discussions to elicit answers to the five questions from the UNAIDS Discussion Paper across seven themes identified as critical for the region: Prevention, Treatment, eMTCT, Human Rights and Social Justice, Gender, Community Engagement, Political Commitment and Sustainability. In addition a High Level Ministerial Panel deliberated through the day and presented a High Level Political Agenda.

One hundred and seventeen (117) participants from across the region attended the one-day consultation. There were from governments and programmes, civil society, communities, academia, and the UN family. In addition a High Level Ministerial Panel deliberated through the day and presented a High Level Political Agenda.

RIATT-ESA gave input into global consultation for the developing of the UNAIDS HIV strategy 2016-2021. Click here to read RIATT-ESA's input.

A UNAIDS–Lancet Commission on Defeating AIDS—Advancing Global Health

A UNAIDS–Lancet Commission on Defeating AIDS—Advancing Global Health

Here is a new report from the UNAIDS Lancet Commission on Defeating AIDS. It is a call for urgently scaling up access to HIV treatment and prevention, taking determined action to advance human rights, and reaching all those populations most at risk. The report finds that countries most affected by HIV must focus on stopping new HIV infections and expanding access to antiretroviral treatment or risk the epidemic rebounding; and offers seven recommendations.

New RIATT-ESA Call-Time to Step-Up: Prioritise Children, Adolescents, Families and Carers Affected By AIDS in Eastern and Southern Africa

The Call to Action Outlines Action Steps Needed to Prioritize Children Affected by AIDS in the era of the Sustainable Development Goals

Ending the HIV pandemic is possible, but to do so, we must act quickly and recognize that the needs of children—the most vulnerable among us and unable to advocate on their own behalf—include but go beyond ending the spread of HIV and finding a cure. 

For children, urgent steps are required including:

  • Better integrating strategies to reach this population into regional and national plans

  • Providing the care and support needed to ensure optimal development

  • Scaling up treatment, prevention and access to services—for children and their carers

The call to action sets out eight critical action steps needed to provide children, adolescents and carers with the focused attention required to turn the tide on HIV and AIDS:

  • Scale-up access to PMTCT services

  • Scale-up paediatric testing (early infant diagnosis)

  • Increase treatment access and reduce loss to follow-up

  • Provide HIV-sensitive social protection services

  • Invest in the early years of children living affected by HIV

  • Strengthen linkages between child protection and HIV services

  • Intensify HIV prevention and treatment for adolescents

  • Strengthen support for primary caregivers and community level care providers